Could We Be More Bethesda?

There have been two big issues in our local news this week, and although they may appear unrelated, they both show up something quite disturbing in our democratic processes.

Unless you’ve slept for the last twenty years, you will be familiar with the word, ‘interconnector’ (no, don’t switch off) – the subsea cable that will unlock the renewables potential of our islands. It emerged recently, following weeks of rumour, that Ofgem is minded not to consent a 600mw cable, though it may yet agree to a 450mw version. The hand-wringing which ensued from various quarters is understandable, because 450 would not leave much spare capacity for community schemes.

The other story, which has been rumbling on for a while now, is about Bethesda Hospice’s funding shortfall. I don’t mind telling you that the first time a MacMillan nurse mentioned the place to me, I shuddered and wept, because of what I felt it symbolised. Reality, though, was so different: my husband spent the last week of his life there, and I with him, never having to leave his side. Looking on, I saw him nursed, not only with dignity and respect, but as though he was every bit as precious to the staff as he was to me. Their care of him, and of me, is something which contributed to the blessing that I felt while walking through the valley of the shadow of death with Donnie.

These nurses didn’t know a lot about the man they were caring for. He might have been a tyrant, or a wife-beater, or a bully. They didn’t know his lovely nature. But it didn’t matter, because they minister to all in their care just the same.

Is it all down to good training? The staff are evidently hand-picked to ensure their suitability for the quiet, dignified and loving environment that the hospice provides. Nonetheless, I believe that there is something more at work here – there is that essence of God which inclines in sympathy towards the human. Every one of us is made in the image of our creator; that, if nothing else, should inspire mutual respect in us, one for the other.

And, if this is possible in the underfunded environs of Bethesda, where some people are living out the hardest moments of their lives, why is it not possible in the community at large?

What is missing in our midst, that we speak so viciously to one another over issues that may be important, yes, but fall far short of being life or death?

The news of the interconnector – which is by no means a final decision, incidentally – has had the opposite effect in some quarters, to what you might expect. While the Comhairle, the Stornoway Trust and our elected representatives at Holyrood and Westminster are all calling for unity in order to boost the local case, there remains one dissenting voice. Playing out their own peninsular war, the people of Point and Sandwick Trust seem determined only to prove that they have had the right answer all along.

In a bizarre move, their honorary president, and former chair, claimed that he had been speaking up for community renewables as a councillor for ‘considerable years’, and had received no support from his thirty colleagues. On closer examination, it seems that he has been saying this for three or so years, but not in the council chamber. It reminds me of that time I almost missed an internal flight from Cairo, because the announcement was made by a lady mumbling ‘Luxor’ in the corner of a noisy departure lounge.

So, you have a councillor who eschews the normal mechanisms of local government. This will not surprise anyone who was privy to the recent Facebook discussion of the Bethesda funding shortfall, in which the councillor intervened in an attempt to silence us. He loftily informed the participants that discussion of the matter in open forum was unhelpful, and that negotiations were taking place behind closed doors.

If that was not enough of a canary down the mine, the manager of Point and Sandwick Trust supplied me with another one this week, when he disparagingly referred to my good self as a ‘token woman’. Now, I couldn’t care less about his opinion of me because, apart from anything else, we are unacquainted. His ignorance of who I am, however, is fairly eclipsed by his disrespect for the ballot box. Perhaps this is understandable, seeing he has been a victim of its vagaries himself in the past, but that doesn’t entitle him to ride roughshod over what the majority wants. Those speaking up for unity – the Comhairle, the Trust, the MSP, the MP – have all been returned by democratic election. They, and not a handful of people in four crofting townships, represent the majority.

It’s difficult to change position, even when you know it is for the greater good. I understand why those who ruthlessly banged the drum against developer-led projects will find it so hard to put that crusade aside now. They will, perhaps, see it as surrender. But it would be more in the order of a dignified truce.

For my part, I will publicly change position on something too, as a pledge of good faith. This time last year, one of our elders surprised me by suggesting it would be good to have a woman – even one – on the Trust because it would ‘stop daft wee cliques forming, like you always get on all-male committees’.

While I am still of the opinion that gender alone is no reason to vote for anyone, I do see the need for some feminine input. We approach the process differently. And I don’t know if it’s because I’m a woman, or a naïve fool, but I like to think that local politics could learn a thing or two from the staff of the hospice: treat people with respect; acknowledge their equal right to an opinion; don’t demean yourself by sinking to a level you will regret later.

Remember, we are all in this together.

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s